RELEVANT PUBLICATIONS

You may find in this section relevant publications on Asylum written by our network experts.

Relevant publications

Community Sponsorship in Europe: Taking Stock, Policy Transfer and What the Future Might Hold

TAN, Nikolas Feith / April 2021

This article explores the recent emergence of community sponsorship of refugees in Europe, an approach which shares responsibility between civil society and the state for the admission and/or integration of refugees. Originally a Canadian model developed to support the resettlement of Indochinese refugees, the model has gained momentum in Europe, with a number of states piloting or establishing community sponsorship schemes. This proliferation, while generally seen as positive for international protection of refugees, has led to conceptual confusion and a significant range of approaches under the “umbrella” concept of community sponsorship. As a result, community sponsorship today may be understood both as a form of resettlement and a complementary pathway to protection. While interest and momentum around community sponsorship is high, little work currently exists mapping and analysing how jurisdictions adopt the community sponsorship model.

Border Procedure: Efficient Examination or Restricted Access to Protection?

VEDSTED-HANSEN, Jens / December 2020

This blogpost focus on the two proposals for a Screening Regulation and for an Asylum Procedure Regulation from the European Commission that must be seen in conjunction, these procedural devices should be considered in the light of the proposed pre-entry screening.

 

GHEZELBASH, Daniel; TAN, Nikolas Feith / September 2020

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a devastating impact on the institution of asylum, exacerbating longer term trends limiting the ability of asylum seekers to cross-borders to seek protection. As a result, the early months of 2020 saw an effective extinguishment of the right to seek asylum. This working paper examines how this played out in Australia, Canada, Europe and the United States. National and regional responses varied, with Australia and the United States effectively ending asylum seeking. In Europe, some states upheld the right to seek asylum by exempting asylum seekers from general border closures, while other countries used the crisis to suspend the right to seek asylum. Finally, this working paper explores strategies for restoring and protecting the right to seek asylum beyond the pandemic.